Native Plants in Stormwater Managament Practices

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Native plant occurs naturally in a particular region, state, ecosystem, and habitat without direct or indirect human actions. Using native plants to restore the landscape or as a substitute for exotic ornamental plantings can help to reverse the trend of species loss. If the environment has been altered significantly through human activities, some work will be necessary to recreate an environment more hospitable to native plants.

Selecting plants for stormwater management practices is not a simple process. Stormwater systems are often affected by a number of environmental conditions that are not conducive to plant growth and survival. Some of these environmental conditions include prolonged flooding, fluctuating water levels, sedimentation and pollutants. Learn more about native plants in Alabama in the following table.

Native Plants in Alabama

Scientific Name

Common Name Growth Habit

Stormwater Practices

Acer saccharinum silver maple tree floodplain

infiltration

filtration strips

Acorus calamus sweetflag herbaceous, grass wet pond
Amorpha fruiticosa false indigo/indigo bush shrub dry pond

floodplain

Asclepias incarnata swamp milkweed/ marsh milkweed herbaceous dry swales
Betula  nigra river birch tree dry pond
Boltonia asteroides white doll’s daisy herbaceous rain gardens

infiltration

Cephalanthus occidentalis buttonbush shrub wet & dry ponds floodplain

rain gardens

infiltration

wet swales

Cornus amomum silky dogwood shrub floodplain

wet swales

Ilex verticillata winterberry shrub rain gardens

infiltration

wet swales

Lobelia cardinalis cardinal flower herbaceous floodplain

rain gardens

infiltration

wet swales

Lobelia siphilitica great blue lobelia herbaceous dry pond & swales, floodplain

rain gardens

wet swales

infiltration

Osmunda regalis royal fern herbaceous rain gardens

infiltration

wet swales

filtration strips

Physostegia virginiana obedient plant herbaceous floodplain

infiltration

wet swales

Quercus bicolor swamp white oak tree dry pond

filtration strips